PA Dept. of Health

Project Case Study

:30 TV

Winning a One Show Gold Pencil, FullApologies.com featured full-bleed video of a teen apologizing directly to a friend or a parent of someone they hurt by drinking and driving. A brief story appeared to the side providing context about what happened that night, and afterwards.

Site visitors were encouraged to add their own apologies for not making the right decision after partying. Thousands of people did--most outside of Pennsylvania.

No one wants to be the designated diver. So we created a Responsibility Randomizer, capturing all the names and cell numbers in a group of friends. At random, one person was chosen to make sure everyone else got home safe. Everyone was texted so it was clear who'd be staying sober that night.

We gave teens the ability to send themselves a text, sober self to drunk self. Before the party started, they could remind their post-partying self to be smart. The text would be timed so they'd get it shortly before curfew, when their drunk self would have to start thinking about how to get home.

High School Parking Spots: Unlike handicapped spaces, reserved in spots closest to the door, these spaces were placed farthest from the school.

High School Parking Spots.

We placed mirror clings in high school bathrooms at eye level. Bending in to read the small type, the reader’s eyes become hidden by the black bar.

:30 TV

:30 TV

:30 TV

Earning a Gold Pencil at One Show Interactive, Full Apologies was a campaign that successfully reversed a trend of teen drinking and driving casualties for the PA Dept. of Health.

Millennial teens don’t just blow off the tired “just say no”/“think before you drink” approach. They make fun of it. To reduce teen deaths from drunk driving, we had to find a better way to reach them. Our research showed that teens have no fear of dying—but they find the notion of killing a friend, and then having to live with that, a fate worse than death.

So we put young people in front of the camera and let them apologize to one person they hurt by driving drunk. TV spots showed 30-second clips of the apologies and drove people to fullapologies.com, where the full-length apologies could be seen. Web shorts showed what life can be like for teens who party and then drive. We created innovative tools for the site to help kids make smarter decisions when they weren’t in the clearest frame of mind. And we engaged teens where they congregated, in school parking lots and bathrooms, in ways even they couldn’t ignore.

Visitors spent an average of more than five minutes on the site–many from outside PA–and the decade-long trend of rising statistics was significantly reversed.

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